Rebirth (2011)

 

 

The film begins with a woman being tried for the abduction of a baby four years earlier whom she has until this point raised lovingly as her own. The real mother of the child is distraught but the woman, Kiwako, seems to show no remorse for her actions. Jumping forward to her early twenties, the young child, named Erina, is continuing normally with her life when she is befriended by Chigusa, a young woman of a similar age who seems to know a lot about her. The film moves back and forth to tell the story of Kiwako and the child she abducted, renamed Kaoru by her, and the adult Erina who is trying to find her own way in life.

This film is expertly plotted with a lot of well-thought out characters which resonate with each other, particularly the figures of Erina’s father and her much older lover. Similarly a contrast seems to be drawn between the real mother Ritsuko and Kiwako. The story is driven by a number of twists and reveals and relies on some powerful acting by the main cast which really helps show their thought processes. The music is light and fits well with the films quiet contemplative mood and the cinematography is first rate. The scenic shots in particular are fantastic.

This film is an interesting watch and throws up many ideas about relationships, in particular maternal affection. Covering everything from loss, infidelity and abortion this film is careful not to be overly bombastic but to portray things fairly realistically which in turn makes it more powerful. Deserves the praise it was lauded with on release this is an incredibly gripping drama.

Based on the novel by Mitsuyo Kakuta.

Kitaro(2007)

After the heart stone is stolen from the evil Fox by the bumbling, flatulent Ratboy, it finds it’s way into the hands of a young boy, Kenta. First Kenta’s father and then Kitaro and his motley band of monsters are accused of stealing the stone, as the Fox fights to have it returned. This sparks a chain of confrontations as the parties fight to find the stone(which Kenta is keeping hidden after promising his father). The seemingly convoluted plot, involving quite a cast of characters and numerous twists and turns, is told straightforwardly and moves quickly from scene to scene. And despite it’s flimsy nature the plot is relatively gripping.

The special effects vary between low-budget costumes and make-up and digital effects. While nothing special, they don’t detract from the innovative characters, of the likes of Catgirl, The Sand-Hag, Ratboy, and Uncle Eyeball The style of the film is light considering the subject is ghouls and monsters, having the feel of a children’s Halloween party, rather than a more sinister atmosphere as in some of the manga.

The film is aimed squarely at children and contains enough physical humour and excitement to keep them entertained. At it’s heart it’s a film about the bond between a father and his son, and the transitions between the comedic moments and family drama, in particular a moving scene towards the end involving Kenta and his father, are done well.

Based on the Manga and subsequent Anime series by Shigeru Mizuki.